Balancing the number of Rotten Tomatoes!

For those who think independent cinema is almost like inviting cannons firing rotten tomatoes, our sacks are full! We are dreamers and we dream about making people perceive art differently. We like forcing a different thought. Why?

How many films that you have watched helped you in expanding your thought, opinions or empathy for fellow human beings? Aren’t we compulsively happy about the kind of art that is sold in the name of entertainment in the present times? Well, it will be an understatement to say that Hollywood, Bollywood or our regional cinema fails to produce film that are equally thought-provoking. However, the acceptance of such works is yet to see the broad light of the day. Thus it’s better to consume rotten tomatoes than sponsor sugar-coated reviews on national dailies.

 

Independent filmmakers are often accused of making something that fails to generate enough buzz in the market. Very true! I don’t feel they have a reason to make a buzz out of a star controversy or a billion dollar pay check. We do it because we simply want to share a story – we take risks. We don’t owe anything to anyone other than the handful of audience we have.

 

The Cemetery is not made to capture sugar-coated reviews and attract Facebook likes. I would rather appeal for sincere and frank perception. I’ll have no regrets discussing the faults in the film and neither do I expect an ‘all-so-good’ review. I am more concerned about how viewers react to an emotionally dry scheme of visual sequences. I am concerned about how viewers feel about the open-ended climax and I am really looking forward to some real criticism from all those who have resolved to dedicate 20 precious minutes of your life.

 

Independent Cinema will not flaunt big banners but will knock your doors and urge you to think differently. As an indie filmmaker, I tried the same in my debut project. An attempt that might seem feeble to a few but I can promise that the passion for something indigenous will reflect in the entire work. Be it the narrative, the music, the locales or the acting, The Cemetery will be a different span of film-watching for any quintessential film lover!

 

Determination and passion will drive us forward, in the hope that a few more stories that lurk around our not so dramatic lives will find their destination someday! Expecting support and honest feedback… Join the Facebook event and watch The Cemetery as it releases online on June 1.

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Nirbaak – a true reflection of honest artistic conscience…

I couldn’t connect with Nirbaak. I didn’t go all “claps and praises” for the film. I didn’t understand why Srijit made a film like Nirbaak.

No, Nirbaak is definitely not the right movie choice for a Sunday afternoon with your beau. A few left before the show ended and even fewer applauded. Yet I couldn’t ravel what I saw.

Okay, so going frame by frame, it’s the story of a narcissist, inter-species love and necrophilia, punctuated with some metaphysical sequences. Is that it? So Nirbaak is a “slow, pseudo-intellectual, claiming-to-be art house movie gravitated by Sushmita Sen”.

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The post-watch adda of the film was not so speechless. While some considered it a complete fiasco, others called it an innuendo of what today’s Bengali film industry can look up to as an exemplary creation.

Contrivance, mixed with the right amount of quandary can give rise to a masterpiece and Nirbaak is one such example, undoubtedly. This acerbic movie is not for everyone. And why should it be? After all, not many of us listen to the wind or understand our pet’s parable or relate to the tryst between the morgue-man and corpse.

 

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Thanks to the team who could think of such an incendiary plot and pass it through the red-eyed censor and make it to the theatres.

Keeping the entire buzz aside, do yourself a favour. Go and watch the movie. After all, the fulcrum of the movie is all about loving yourself and everything else would fall in place.

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The relentless shenanigans of the Bengali film industry didn’t create any sense of sordid amongst the tireless (read sick) remake movie-makers. It takes a lot of guts to pull up all the good factors in a single movie and challenge the moviegoers ‘universal mindset and passing the test with aplomb. Nirbaak answers, or rather questions the base of the modern film industry with all its pedagogic skills what an “experimental” film would be like. How you perceive Dali or what Van Gogh permeates in you is absolutely individual aesthetic coaching. What essentially this movie makes you feel is the surreal world which probably doesn’t get through our membrane too often. The ubiquitous sense of surrealism is not always felt but you cannot but subscribe to this hypnagogic element of life.

 

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I watched the recent Bengali film Nirbaak last evening. It is still with me and I’m still very profoundly with the characters of the film. A number of fellow audiences in the theatre thought the film was insane and tried to bully their partners indicating the time that they are wasting while watching an old narcissist bathing or a tree having an orgasm or a fetish love of a bitch for her master or even a morgue-man’s first found love in a corpse.

Well, to be honest Nirbaak is a film that is not made very often in India and in terms of commercial cinema, this is a rare species. Thanks to the portfolio of the director, a substantial number of movie-goers managed to make it to the theatres. Some were forced by their mates and some were probably hoping to experience another urban-romantic pot-boiler. Nirbaak disappointed them!

A film dedicated to Salvador Dali, the director Srijit Mukherjee draws inspiration from one of his abstract and surrealistic paintings while conceiving the concept of Nirbaak- very evident and very aesthetically done! Ambitious as a commercial project and revolutionary as an alternate cinema, Nirbaak emerges as a soliloquy of human psych depicting the not-so-happy minds of our society and their unconscious connections with voiceless sources of happiness (read respite). Hats off to the concept, attempt and the effort!

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I don’t prefer writing reviews narrating the story or the good and bad moments of the film, I fancy investigating the mind space of the creative personalities involved in a project. While Srijit’s earlier films promised something for every soap-watching audience, this film condescendingly disobeyed his own style and he challenged himself with a form of cinema that is not visited very often. This is either ways not a review but a vote of thanks and a heart-felt congratulation to the entire team. Nirbaak, very organically creates a space and a scope for the otherwise abstract ideas resonating art and the truth of being an artist.

 

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Wrapping up, I would like to assert the significance of art being a medium that can foresee truth. Art should disclose truth, truth of the present hour, truth from the untold stories and truth of being differently happy from varied perspectives. Nirbaak as a piece of art achieves them gracefully!

John F. Kennedy in a speech to bid farewell to the immortal poet Robert Frost said, “If art is to nourish the roots of our culture, society must set the artist free to follow his vision wherever it takes him. We must never forget that art is not a form of propaganda; it is a form of truth.”

Nirbaak arrogantly defied to be a form of propaganda and evolved as an artistically poised truth!

Signing off from the desk of mymotionpicture, thanking a fellow writer & friend for contributing in this excerpt and keeping the indispensable arguments alive.